Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Wacky Wednesday - Skydiving

Earlier this week we shared a quote related to fear and how it is in the way of everything you want. To keep the theme rolling here is Will Smith sharing a moment of pure terror turning to bliss:



At the point of maximum danger is the point of minimum fear. It's bliss!

The full story from the video is 6 minutes long, which you can find here.


Monday, May 22, 2017

Leadership Quote - George Addair

Photo: https://www.grandcanyonwest.com/skywalk--eagle-point.htm

At the Grand Canyon there is the Skywalk. It is a horseshoe shaped steel and glass structure that juts out over the Grand Canyon (4000 ft.) and makes you feel like you are stepping onto thin air. To get on the bridge, they take all the items out of your pockets, you have to wear little booties, and you aren't allowed to bring your phone or camera. Instead, there are people whose job is to take pictures, you hand in the ticket they give you and you get a great memory.

Erin and I are not the easily scared type of people, in fact, we were told we could jump on the glass and we did, much to the dismay of several people nearby. Someday somebody remind me to share how I was the photo-op for a bus of Chinese tourists. It's a good story.

Monday, May 8, 2017

Leadership Quote - Will Rogers



Lots of things happening in the Morey household these last couple of weeks. Moved to a new home, the family finally arrived with me, and then a trip to Phoenix followed immediately by a trip to Sweden for a client. Hopefully, things can start to settle to a level of normalcy. I apologize that I missed last week, between the short trips, jet lag, and poor internet, I just didn't have the bandwidth (get it?) to get things posted from overseas. It tells me I need to start building a repository of material. Anyway, here is this week's quote:


Thanks to Erin Morey for the meme!

First and foremost, are you on the right track? Are you doing what you want to be doing, or are you doing things that support what you want to be doing? People often find themselves doing things because it is expected of them, or they think "this is a temporary situation, someday..." The problem is that temporary can become permanent when you aren't paying attention and someday quickly becomes never in those situations. So, are you on the right track?

Second, are you making progress on that track? The world moves even faster than in Will Rogers times, which means that if you are standing still opportunity will pass you by, and others on the same track may run you over to get it. I recently read an article that a woman invented a tool to help her daughter concentrate, perhaps you've seen it:
Fidget Spinner - The Original Stress Relief Toy
As Seen on TV and Beyond
Well, for want of $400 she let the patent slip and now companies are making millions while she receives nothing, is struggling with house payments and doesn't have a reliable car. She was on the right track but has been run over. Now, I am not going to make judgments, because I cannot know her situation. All I can say is that in 2005 if she spent $400 would we be seeing this tool everywhere still today? And would she be making money from it, rather than watching it on TV and wondering?

The world is full of these situations. So, what track are you on? And are you standing still or making progress?

Monday, April 24, 2017

Leadership Quote - Anonymous



Sports history is full of teams that were full of superstars yet failed to win championships (here is a list of 5 NBA teams in recent history, but we can find more across all sports). Why is that? So many teams appear "guaranteed" for a championship, how could they not with all that talent? 

The answer is in this quote, which I wish I knew the original author. The superstars with all their talent played to be superstars and for the glory rather than for the team. Because the players were more interested (more often) in the name on the back of the jerseys, the name on the front lost. Egos got in the way of teamwork and the teams were unable to gel and win championships. 

The same holds true in most businesses. Management strives to put the best team together, however even if they bring together a group of superstars, the management team often misses the mark of getting the team to work together for the same goal. 

What are you doing with your team? Do they know what the objectives are? Do they understand what the priority is for the entire team, and not just the individual? And are you managing the people so that they aren't in it only for themselves? If you have a "player" who is brilliant, but constantly causes team dynamic issues, it may be time for a change. 

What actions can you take to make sure people are working for the team? I would love to hear your ideas. Perhaps we can make it an article for future publication?

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Leadership Quote of the Week - Darren LaCroix Part 2

This is a quick one, as I have an NSA conference this weekend, then an international trip immediately after. Towards the end of last year I shared a quote of the week from World Champion Speaker Darren LaCroix, who delivered it directly to an audience who was getting a little too empathetic for a person receiving an evaluation. Reviewing the post, the material was good, but the picture didn't work with the written material. Here's why:


I have two young boys who I love more than anything in the world. One of our favorite activities are board games. Monopoly, Risk, Settlers of Catan, Sorry, Uno, Skipbo, Scattegories, etc. etc. etc. The games are fun and the kids love them, but there is a caveat. Erin (my wife) and I DON'T LET THEM WIN. Now we aren't mean during the games, and we may go easy on them, but we don't intentionally lose.

Checkers is one of the more difficult games for the kids because it requires looking at the whole board, and they need to think several steps ahead, but they love to play against dad. When we play checkers in particular, I have a tendency to make my move to watch the surprise, then back the pieces up and ask them how they could have avoided the move (double jumps, triple jumps, king-me's etc.). The boys will look at the board and then show me how they could have avoided my move.

Here's where the not so nice part happens. I then reset the board to what it was after my original move and we continue the game. The results, thus far, are that the boys are getting better at checkers and thinking about the whole board. I'm not mean, but I'm definitely not "nicing" them in the game. Hence the picture of one of my son's hands on a checker's board with this quote.

In a similar vein, are you helping your team grow or are you being nice? Are you letting the team face the challenging situations, or are you bailing them out? It's a fine line between letting them experience the challenge but not letting them fail. Are you attempting to walk that line, or are you bailing the team out the moment they hit a speedbump?

Enjoy the weekend and look for an update next week from Europe!





Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Wacky Wednesday - Audi Desert

My wife is a bit of an artist (see this week's leadership quote) and an amateur photographer, which means I'm often introduced to differences in perspective because of her talents and interests. This particular picture caught my attention:

audi-q2-photography-miniature-toy-cars-felix-hernandez-3
hernandezdreamphography.com (h/t: petapixel)















Why this picture? What if I told you it was a toy car?